Resilience Exchange

What have we learned so far?

Where next?

This is a part-way report on BRACED, providing a snapshot of where the programme has got to so far. Setting up resilience-building interventions in a manner likely to produce sustainable change takes time. Significant strides have been made in positive, trusting working relationships with communities, and in establishing broader strategic partnerships with authorities and other organisations at different levels and across sectors. The value of these should not be underestimated.

Where Next?

BRACED is still being implemented and results are tentative. A new edition of the Resilience Exchange will follow in 2018, building on these themes and adding new ones. Taking advantage of additional time for results to emerge – and for reflection on them – this subsequent Resilience Exchange will take a more critical look at how to build resilience, challenge our assumptions, and delve deeper into what has been learned for the benefit of a global resilience community.

This is a part-way report on BRACED, providing a snapshot of where the programme has got to so far. Setting up resilience-building interventions in a manner likely to produce sustainable change takes time. Significant strides have been made in positive, trusting working relationships with communities, and in establishing broader strategic partnerships with authorities and other organisations at different levels and across sectors. The value of these should not be underestimated.

 

Activities too are producing results. Increases in food production and earned income can change lives. Steps towards altering people’s perceptions of roles and opportunities for women – both women’s views and the views of men – constitute significant progress in certain communities. Thanks to BRACED projects, thousands of people are using financial services for the first time, and many thousands of people now have access to scientific climate and weather information in their own language.

The work of the BRACED partners and the Knowledge Manager is in full flow, so the Resilience Exchange will return with a follow-up edition in 2018. Since there will have been more time for results to emerge, and for reflection, the next report will take a more critical look, with a stronger emphasis on evaluation of what has been learned. It will present updates on stories told here and add further evidence on new findings from research and evaluations at both the project and programme levels. Quasi-experimental evaluations will produce quantified results on resilience-building efforts of some of the BRACED projects at a household level.

In addition, research in the coming year will cover themes including livestock markets, financial services, gender-based violence interventions in post-disaster contexts, risk governance and working in consortia. Work is also taking place under the BRACED Knowledge Manager on the World Bank Adaptive Social Protection programme, looking at the links between adaptive social protection and resilience. Synthesis reports will provide further evidence on where and how interventions are increasing resilience. A further research piece aims to challenge assumptions around resilience building.

The coming year will also see a more intense dialogue with partners on what these findings mean for resilience practitioners, and also for national policy processes, for humanitarian and development finance, and especially for the ambitions under the Paris agreement. 

And of course, there will also be lots of new stories of change. Resilience building is a human activity, and all humans have stories to tell.